Why ??? Perfect Reflective Model

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    Erik Kubiňan CR

    Well, this is a funny case, because even though the object is metallic, it has lots of patina and micro detail. So once there is an even light in the shooting scene and no harsh directional light, this suits for an ideal object for photogrammetry. If you look closely to where he shoots the subject, it actually could be compared to a rock, with a bit of a shine. So this is not the best case of scanning reflective objects. If otherwise this would be very reflective or featureless, the subject would have to be sprayed, powdered, projected pattern or any other way of defining feature points and matte surface together.

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    jie

    Hi Erik,

    from video ( 4:46 ) , you can see all the pictures he shoot has a bit of shiny , but the result mesh show in ( 4:53) is decent .

    As far as i know , photogrammetry software can't tolerate / bear shiny picture , otherwise it will cause noise in finally constructed mesh.

    but this mesh ( 4:53) seems got no noise even the constructed pictures has kind of shinny . So , can photogrammetry accept this kind of shinny picture for decent model ?

    if so , how should i judge how shinny pictures should be for this kind of decent model ?

     

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    Erik Kubiňan CR

    I think I have covered clearly why the model looks good above. The shine is not that strong there in the pictures. A shine that would wash out all of the feature points has to really be pure white and very glossy. As mentioned above, what saved this model is all of the tiny detail on the helmet that creates perfect feature points for detection.

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    jie

    OK, Got it . thanks again Erik

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